Thread Contributor: Naiwen
British English vs American English!
#1
Which do you use the most and which do you think is the best? I like speaking British English because I think it's more refined and more elegant and polished than American English, what do you think of them and their differences? For instance, I know color is spelled that way in American English, however in British English, its spelled "colour". And sometimes it gives me an error if I spell it "colour", on certain forums, such as this one. And a most peculiar thing, defence and defense are both equally used in American English and British English, although on this forum, its also giving a spelling error. Lastly, the word "offense", I think in British English, is spelled "offence", cause I've seen some British people spell it that way. If you know any other differences between these two languages, you can feel free to share them with here, as a non-native speaker, its hard for me to distinguish whats British English and what's American English, thanks a lot for helping me understand the differences between these two.
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#2
I might be wrong but I've always learnt that "offence" is the abstract noun of "offense".

I was in London a month ago. I was ready to be humiliated in all sorts due to English not being my first language. To my surprise the Londoners' English was very clear and understandable despite being clearly British.

I find American easier to understand, and my own accent is American-ish but I gotta tell you, British is class.

Scot English gave me the creeps.
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#3
(05-23-2016, 02:25 PM)Electric Shock Wrote: I might be wrong but I've always learnt that "offence" is the abstract noun of "offense".

I was in London a month ago. I was ready to be humiliated in all sorts due to English not being my first language. To my surprise the Londoners' English was very clear and understandable despite being clearly British.

I find American easier to understand, and my own accent is American-ish but I gotta tell you, British is class.

Scot English gave me the creeps.

I didn't know that, same thing goes with "defence" and "defense", yes? Anyways, what do you mean by "abtract", please? First tome I ever hear of the term, thanks for further clarification.
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#4
I didn't say "abtract" I said "abstract" :P
[Image: 2146799274.png]

http://writingexplained.org/offence-vs-o...difference

#5
(05-23-2016, 02:25 PM)Electric Shock Wrote: I might be wrong but I've always learnt that "offence" is the abstract noun of "offense".

I was in London a month ago. I was ready to be humiliated in all sorts due to English not being my first language. To my surprise the Londoners' English was very clear and understandable despite being clearly British.

I find American easier to understand, and my own accent is American-ish but I gotta tell you, British is class.

Scot English gave me the creeps.

I'm Scottish and I will admit majority of the scottish population speak with a strong accent which can be quite intimidating but if for the likes of myself and a good portion of us, speaking clearly is the way to go. 

However I don't always understand American English some of the slang words I still haven't gotten used to.
If you need assistance with anything, feel free to message me.

I am NOT a robot or am I?

#6
(05-25-2016, 03:11 PM)Electric Shock Wrote: I didn't say "abtract" I said "abstract" :P
[Image: 2146799274.png]

http://writingexplained.org/offence-vs-o...difference

Oops sorry, typo on my part, anyways, thanks for the clarification. I read the site and all was clearly explained on it. Thanks!
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