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[TechRadar] BlackBerry finally accepts no one wants the Classic
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BlackBerry finally accepts no one wants the Classic

<img src="http://cdn.mos.techradar.com/art/mobile_phones/BlackBerry/Classic/Review/Hands%20on/hands%20on%2002-470-75.jpg" alt="BlackBerry finally accepts no one wants the Classic"/><p>BlackBerry is discontinuing the <a href="http://www.techradar.com/reviews/phones/mobile-phones/blackberry-classic-1277422/review">BlackBerry Classic</a> - shedding the ancient &quot;full keyboard and square screen&quot; design to make room for fresher blood.</p><p>&quot;To keep innovating and advancing our portfolio, we are updating our smartphone lineup with state-of-the-art devices,&quot; <a href="http://blogs.blackberry.com/2016/07/change-is-only-natural-a-classic-model-makes-way/?utm_source=dlvr.it&amp;utm_medium=twitter">writes</a> Ralph Pini, Chief Operating Officer and GM for Devices at BlackBerry. &quot;The Classic has long surpassed the average lifespan for a smartphone in today's market.&quot;</p><p>Known for its emphasis on security and a full physical keyboard for emailing on-the-go, the BlackBerry Classic was a popular go-to in the business and government sector.</p><p>However, as market share for the native BlackBerry OS <a href="http://www.techradar.com/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/84-7-of-all-global-smartphone-shipments-feature-the-android-platform-1261548">dwindled to a measly 0.5%</a> in favor of platforms like iOS and Android, the company found itself in dire need of shaking things up in order to remain in the phonemaking business.</p><h3>Bet it all on Black(berry)</h3><p>BlackBerry's shift away from its older designs opens up the possibility of working more with the more widely-accepted and popular Android platform.</p><p>BlackBerry's last stab at developing Android phones - the <a href="http://www.techradar.com/reviews/phones/mobile-phones/blackberry-priv-1308303/review">BlackBerry Priv</a> - came out to mostly positive reviews but ultimately fell short in sales, mainly attributed to the Priv's unattractive launch price at $699, (about £559/AU$975).</p><p>In response, BlackBerry is reportedly making a last-ditch attempt on Google's OS - planning <a href="http://www.techradar.com/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/blackberry-s-next-phones-may-be-its-last-gasp-with-android-1324272">three new Android-powered handsets</a> codenamed Argon, Neon, and Mercury that will feature more competitive prices and improved functionality.</p><p>Ditching the Classic is already a point of no return for BlackBerry, as the US government instantly released a memo <a href="http://www.recode.net/2016/7/3/12088500/senate-blackberry-services-revenue">dropping support</a> for the phone in response to BlackBerry's decision - cutting out the major market for the simple, security-minded handset.</p><p>Will newer, hipper phones save BlackBerry? The future remains unclear, as smartphone sales this year <a href="http://www.techradar.com/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/blackberry-s-priv-adventure-is-over-but-it-s-not-finished-with-android-1318745">will decide</a> whether or not the company will ditch making devices altogether and instead focus on software and services.</p><ul><li>Everything you need to know about <a href="http://www.techradar.com/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/android-7-what-we-want-to-see-1311290">Android Nougat</a></li></ul><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/techradar/allnews/~4/bdnangibRMM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>

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