Thread Contributor: identityissues8
How Should Society 'Tackle' Domestic Abuse?
#1
A problem on-going. An issue behind closed doors.
In many cases it takes honestly standing up and speaking out to take the first step to freedom for victims. A step that seems a mile high for many, so they (and often times their children) suffer on in silence and on come the after affects of this awful scourge on our society.

The victims could be anyone. Race, gender, sexuality or age are absolute non-issues and it's something we need to talk about.

My local council, The City of Greater Dandenong have some great awareness campaigns going and I'm sure some support programs that I've not yet even looked into, but is simply making people aware doing enough? Would banners be an effective step to make people take that first step into coming forward and asking for help?

Who knows? But it's a great start.

I guess this will be out forum's general domestic abuse thread. :)

I start the discussion with a confronting albeit necessary article.

Brain battered

IT is little known that brain injury is one of the leading causes of disability in Australia, with one in 12 people living with acquired brain injuries.

Violence is one of the main causes of brain injury in WA. While men dominate the statistics, accounting for 75 per cent of people diagnosed with a brain injury, many women also suffer brain injuries from family or domestic violence.

In the lead-up to Brain Injury Awareness Week (August 17-24), brain injury caused by family violence is an issue that needs community attention.

Evidence suggests many women in physically abusive relationships are at risk of suffering brain injuries. Statistically, one third of women who are victims of family violence will sustain head trauma.

However, in many cases, women are not even aware that they may have sustained a brain injury.

Their immediate concern is on the visible signs of the abuse and many do not realise that poor short-term memory, irritability or depression may be a sign of brain injury.

Because of the nature of ongoing domestic violence, over time repeated brain injuries can lead to a range of increased cognitive, physical and emotional disabilities, or personality or behavioural changes. There is a strong link between brain injury and mental health difficulties.

People with brain injuries are more likely to be estranged from friends and family, increasing social isolation and vulnerability.

They are also more at risk of being unemployed, homeless or involved with the justice system.

Early intervention services aimed at reducing violence and supporting individuals who experience family and domestic violence are critical.

Increased awareness of the causes, signs and effects of brain injury are also essential to help lessen the incidence of brain injury in WA, and to help people with acquired brain injuries access appropriate support. Headwest provides advocacy support to people with a brain injury in WA.

In the present climate, where cuts to government funding for community services seem to be the norm, vulnerable people are even more at risk.

With each cut, there is a greater subsequent cost for the community in supporting people with a brain injury.

Surely, prevention is best.

TRACY FOULDS, chief executive,

Headwest Brain Injury

Association of WA Inc.

http://www.communitynews.com.au/news/Bra...ed/7673907

#2
With restraining measures.

#3
I think society should tackle domestic abuse by look at the evidence case by case only and not just taking someones word for it. The depressing I noticed is that people only care about abuse that is done to women, when it is done to a man no one care.
This discrimination against men is caused by most police forces using duluth model which essentially says that women are always the victim and men are always the abuser.

#4
(04-16-2017, 05:35 PM)thebestofthebest Wrote: I think society should tackle domestic abuse by look at the evidence case by case only and not just taking someones word for it. The depressing I noticed is that people only care about abuse that is done to women, when it is done to a man no one care.
This discrimination against men is caused by most police forces using duluth model which essentially says that women are always the victim and men are always the abuser.

There is also different forms of abuse.  There is also emotional abuse and mental abuse.  But some people only see it as abuse if it leaves a mark on a person, such as a bruise or an injury of some sort.  But I agree with you, the abuse isn't just limited to just one gender over the other.  Also, they should look at abuse against children as well.



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)